ArtPatron Magazine
Palm Springs - Laguna Beach



History in Art

Highlighting some historical moments in art whether it be in music, writting, acting or fine art.

Frieda-Belinfante as a man.jpg

Frieda Belinfante Cellist, Conductor, Nazi Outwitter

In 1994, Dutch cellist and conductor Frieda Belinfante gave an interview to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. She’d been invited to do so by the museum’s European representative, Klaus Mueller, who’d recently screened a film about gays and lesbians during the Holocaust, and was tasked with bringing their stories to light.

 The Andrews Sisters, (l-r) Maxene, Patty, and LaVerne. --- Image by © Michael Ochs Archives/Corbis

Vic Schoen, The Big Band Man Who Saved the Andrews Sisters

The rise of the Big Band during the early 1930s signaled a major shift in American popular music. Prior to World War I, turn-of-the-century rhythms had supported tame social dances such as the polka and the waltz, but after the war, the rise of more suggestive couplings such as the foxtrot, lindy hop, and jitterbug required more complicated arrangements and a bigger sound. Swing music arrived as the most recent offshoot of New Orleans Jazz, but the hard 4/4 time of traditional jazz was still too improvisational. Unlike jazz, swing required compositions and arrangements, giving a greater role to arrangers and conductors, and the tunes themselves were more lithesome and springy, focusing on sections of orchestras intermingling rather than just soloists.


BIG FISH,Big Fisherman Zane Grey on Catalina

Those were the words of 33-year-old Zane Grey, who was writing in his journal shortly before leaving on his honeymoon. He had married Lina “Dolly” Roth, and while he didn’t have the wherewithal to pay for an extended honeymoon, Dolly did. And she wanted to go places her new husband really didn’t—the Grand Canyon, Colorado, and California. In other words, the West.


Palm trees are such a ubiquitous feature of life and art in Southern California that we take them for granted. But the fact is that only one species—the California fan palm—is native to the region. Known to the scientifically minded as Washingtonia filifera, they grow in scattered and sheltered oases where they have access to water. And the area around Palm Springs can boast the greatest concentration of the trees in the nation.